Monthly Archives: August 2019

1 Timothy 6.3-10

Title: The Four Features of False Teachers

Text: 1 Tim 6:3-10

CIT: What out for men who lead others astray; you’ll notice them by four distinct features;

CIS: The marks of these men are still evident…

 

Introduction: I’m grateful for the men who’ve walked through 1 Timothy with me. Jason and Joshua, Duffey and Shawn, Andrew and Henry. Thanks, guys, we have a meeting on the calendar for tonight. Andrew was hoping that we could get together and offer him some guidance in his work. Be thinking about that. I reach out by text later to see who can be there.

What a blessing to share in this ministry of the Word with these men, who are very near and dear to my heart. To those men: I hope you’ve been challenged. I hope you’ve been encouraged. I hope you’ve learned something – no matter the level of your experience in handling God’s Truth. I love you men and hope and pray for your continued growth in these areas.

Andrew’s conclusion last Sunday morning in his sermon was: We exist for the glory of God.

I’d like to add to that. We exist for the glory of God. And here is the scary part: you will glorify God in your life – no matter how you live that life. Your sin brings glory to God. Those who reject and press against the Truth of God will ultimately display his tremendous glory through their rebellion. God will be proven to be right and he will be glorified. God is glorified when his grace and mercy are displayed through his forgiveness of our sin. Someone might say, “Well then Fred, should we continue to sin so that God might continue to be glorified?” And I say μὴ γένοιτο! God forbid!

I have often prayed that God would not let me be one of those people. I want to glorify God in and through my life as displayed in obedience and faithfulness to him.

In today’s passage, we find men who are not like the men you’ve seen teach and preach this past summer. The men in the text are false teachers and their passion is their own fleshly appetites. Paul presents to Timothy four features of these false teachers:

  1. Their Characteristics
  2. Their Conduct
  3. Their Compulsion
  4. Their Condemnation

Look with me at v 3-4 to identify the first feature of a false teacher:

I.     The False Teacher’s Characteristics (3-4a)

exp.: rd v 3-4; If anyone teaches a different doctrine and does not agree with the sound words of our Lord Jesus Christ and the teaching that accords with godliness, he is puffed up with conceit and understands nothing.

  1. He teaches a different doctrine; it’s the same, but it is different. I’ve told you about this word before; heteros; (3a) ἑτεροδιδασκαλεῖ; hetero another (of a different kind) v homos; another (of the same kind; ) He does not agree with the Lord’s teaching. (3b) It isn’t healthy (sick) and doesn’t center on the Lord’s teaching.
  2. He is ungodly. (3c) His teaching isn’t teaching that accords with godliness.
  3. He is conceited. (4a) word is difficult to translate. This could be translated foolish.
  4. He understands nothing; If you translate this word (τετύφωται) conceited, then “understands nothing” (ἐπιστάμενος) is concessive (He is conceited, even though he knows nothing.) However, if τετύφωτα means foolish, then ἐπιστάμενος is an intensifier (He is foolish and knows nothing). Both would be true.

app.: The characteristics of a false teacher are apparent: his teaching doesn’t coincide with scripture. It doesn’t line up with what Christ has taught us. Here’s a good way to spot him: His teachings are more about his knowledge of some concept, even though he might not even grasp what he’s teaching. His teaching points to him and not to Christ. It puffs him up and not Jesus. It makes much of him and not Jesus.

t.s.: 1st, we see his Characteristics. 2nd, we see his conduct.

II.    The False Teacher’s Conduct (4b -5)

exp.: What he teaches, transfers over into his behavior; continuing on in v 4…He has an unhealthy craving for controversy and for quarrels about words, which produce envy, dissension, slander, evil suspicions, and constant friction among people who are depraved in mind and deprived of the truth, imagining that godliness is a means of gain.

‘Unhealthy craving’; Lit.: sick, ailing to the point of death. In English, someone might say a morbid curiosity (NASB). This ‘desire’ is in contradiction to the healthy, sound teaching of Christ in v 3; look at this progression of his conduct:

  • 1st, a ‘sick’ craving for controversy, quarrels about words, some translations say, “fights w/ words”; this is a compound word – two words put together: lit.: λόγος – word and μάχη – fight;
  • 2nd, this produces envy and dissension,
  • 3rd, which moves to slander and evil suspicions,
  • and the result is that the church lies in constant friction; this is a natural progression: Bill Mounce writes: Where there are speculations and word battles, one naturally finds envy and strife; envy and strife naturally develop into slander and evil suspicions, and where these are present there is a constant irritation. And these flow out from the characteristics he has already displayed. It moves naturally from the characteristics of his teaching to the conduct of his life, which is naturally divisive; that is what Satan wants; this is why Paul warns Timothy earlier; 3:6, 7: He must not be a recent convert, or he may become puffed up with conceit and fall into the condemnation of the devil. Moreover, he must be well thought of by outsiders, so that he may not fall into disgrace, into a snare of the devil.

ill.: In October of 2007, a story came out of Amsterdam, in the Netherlands that shook many people. The children of Barneveld found an interesting plaything. They didn’t know what it was, but it was cool looking, so they played with it. One of the kids found it while playing in the dirt. Soon, they began to create games with this new play toy. It stayed on the playground for months, being there each day when the kids went out to play on the playground. They played catch with it. They hit it; threw it; slammed it on the ground; they created all types of games around this plaything. One day some months later, an adult finally took notice. Authorities were called and sure enough, it was confirmed that the children had unearthed a live, unexploded artillery shell from World War II. The authorities took the plaything away and exploded it in a safe place.

app.: I think about those kids and wonder where the adults were. I wonder if any adults saw and didn’t think anything about it. What took so long? Were these adults, who were responsible for these children, lazy? Or, were they simply ignorant? Either way, this is an example of the supervision of such leaders who don’t know about the explosive device they’re pushing on their followers. Such false teachers are either lazy or ignorant or both.

t.s.: They’re more caught up in themselves than they are their listeners. 1st, we see the Characteristics of these false teachers and (2nd) how it transfers over into his behavior through his Conduct and continues to drive him. And beginning in verse 6, what see what drives him, his compulsion…rd v 6;

III.   The False Teacher’s Compulsion (6-10)

exp.: But godliness with contentment is great gain, for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world. But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content. But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. 10 For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils. It is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs.

Godliness with contentment is great gain; but not so with these false teachers. They are not content w/ godliness. They want more – physical stuff. They are not content with what they have (the material blessings); So, they use their teaching to chase after monetary gain; they desire gold instead of God;

In Philippians, Paul writes: 17 Brothers, join in imitating me, and keep your eyes on those who walk according to the example you have in us. 18 For many, of whom I have often told you and now tell you even with tears, walk as enemies of the cross of Christ. 19 Their end is destruction, their god is their belly, and they glory in their shame, with minds set on earthly things.

ill.: In 14th Century Belgium the was a King, Raynald III. Raynald had a younger brother, Edward. I’m not sure what happened or how it happened, but Raynald had a major disagreement with his younger brother Edward. Edward was so angry at his older brother, that he led a successful revolt against him. Raynald was defeated by his younger brother, but Edward chose not to kill him.

Instead, (and you’ve probably heard this story before) Edward did something incredibly cruel to his brother. He built a room around Raynald in the Nieuwkerk castle and promised him he could regain his title and property as soon as he was able to leave the room. This would not have been difficult for most people since the room had several windows and a door of normal-sized proportions—none of which were locked or barred. The problem was Raynald’s size. To regain his freedom, he needed to lose weight.

But Edward knew his older brother. Each day, Edward sent a variety of delicious foods into the room. Instead of dieting his way out of prison, Raynald grew even larger. When Duke Edward was accused of cruelty, he had a ready answer: My brother is not a prisoner. He may leave anytime he wants to do so. Raynald stayed in that room for 10 years and wasn’t released until after Edward died in battle. By then his health was so ruined that he died within a year—a prisoner of his own appetite.

app.: False teachers are concerned with their own appetites for adoration, admiration, prestige, position. They feed their selfish desires by using people. They ignorantly lead people astray through selfish ambition and vain conceit. I’m reminded of Ezekiel 34: 1The word of the Lord came to me: “Son of man, prophesy against the shepherds of Israel; prophesy, and say to them, even to the shepherds, Thus says the Lord God: Ah, shepherds of Israel who have been feeding yourselves! Should not shepherds feed the sheep? You eat the fat, you clothe yourselves with the wool, you slaughter the fat ones, but you do not feed the sheep. The weak you have not strengthened, the sick you have not healed, the injured you have not bound up, the strayed you have not brought back, the lost you have not sought, and with force and harshness you have ruled them.

And of course, God’s judgment against those shepherds was harsh.

t.s.: And so will it be for today’s false teachers: The False Teacher’s compulsion to whet and satiate his own appetite will be his downfall, which is the fourth feature…

IV.    The False Teacher’s Condemnation (9-10)

exp.: But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. 10 For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils. It is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs.

  • fall, into (1) temptation, (2) a snare, (3) senseless and harmful desires;
  • plunge into (1) ruin and (2) destruction;
  • wandered from the faith
  • pierced themselves;

app.: Oh, the dangers of using God’s Word to chase after one’s own pursuits and pleasures and passions. Instead, we should be chasing after God, making much of him.

Conclusion: In thinking of this compulsion that leads to condemnation – this appetite where we see their god is their belly, I’m reminded of a funny remark by Philip Yancy. He wrote an article entitled, What 147 Elk taught me about prayer:

I’ve become more convinced than ever that God finds ways to communicate with those who truly seek him, especially when we lower the volume of the surrounding static. I remember reading the account of a spiritual seeker who interrupted a busy life to spend a few days in a monastery.

“I hope your stay is a blessed one,” said the monk who showed the visitor to his cell. “If you need anything, let us know, and we’ll teach you how to live without it.”

Because, all we really need, when it comes right down to it, is Christ!

So, let’s look at our take-a-ways for this morning.

Application:

  • Study God’s Word. Study alone, Study with your spouse, Study with a group, Study at church. I know it is hard to know everything in God’s Word, but the truth is, if you know the genuine article really well, then you’ll recognize the counterfeit when he comes your way. Make sure any author you use takes you back into God’s Word. Don’t just trust a book because you got it from Lifeway!
  • Spiritual maturity is a must; it comes from walking with Christ; it comes from walking with those who’ve walked with Christ, who have been where you are.
    • : Are you in a relationship with a mature believer? Consider it if you’re not.
  • Don’t contribute to the cycle of controversy and quarrels. I think this is probably perpetrated through gossip. So, the simple solution is to just not to participate. Community Group leaders: this is a call for you to keep a close watch on this sort of stuff. (ill.: I have a pastor friend who warned against forming community groups; his experience was that a community group was more of a time to complain; eventually, everyone in that group left the church)
  • Make sure your passionate pursuit is for godliness which leads to contentment, and not gold, which leads to destruction. Ask yourself in whatever you’re doing: why am I doing this…
Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under 1 Timothy, Bible Reading, Christian Living, Scripture, Sermon

1 Timothy 5.17-25

Title: The Biblical Model for Church Leadership: Elders

Text: 1 Tim 5:17-25

CIT: The Church’s Responsibility in Caring for their Elders

CIS: As has been asked of you concerning the deacons, be in prayer as you diligently consider the man or men the elders present to complete their team.

 

Introduction: Keep your place in 1 Timothy and turn to Acts 20. Paul’s journey back to Jerusalem for the last time. On his journey, Paul stops in Miletus after sailing by Ephesus. 16 For Paul had decided to sail past Ephesus, so that he might not have to spend time in Asia, for he was hastening to be at Jerusalem, if possible, on the day of Pentecost. 17 Now from Miletus he sent to Ephesus and called the elders of the church to come to him.

Paul had a very special relationship with these men. Look with me at this passage as he charges them with responsibility.

Rd Acts 20.17-35; He will return to Jerusalem. There, he will be arrested and spend the next two years in Caesarea, where he will appeal to Caesar. That appeal will be granted and he will then spend another two years in Rome. He will leave Timothy in Ephesus to care for the church there and help the elders with their leadership problems.

Church: leading is hard work. It doesn’t come easily by any stretch of the imagination. I know of my accountability. And I fearfully consider the past and pray over the future. I’ve made mistakes. And it scares me. And, I think about those in my life who made being a pastor so hard. I think about those who tried to destroy the church in moments of trying to ‘be right’ or keep their power.

t.s.: In our passage this morning, Paul will remind Timothy and the church of their responsibility to the elders: Respecting them, Protecting them, Correcting them and Selecting them.

  1. Respecting your Elders (17-18)

exp.: rd 17-18; Give respect and ‘double honor’ to the elders (Acts 20) in your body; vb – “be considered worthy”  is one word in Greek; imperative verb; which elders? The ones who rule well; requirements: ministry of the Word, prayer; Here we see responsibility in ‘ruling”; not lording, but προί̈́στημι (proistēmi); Stand before; a beautiful picture of leadership, out front; head of household;

1 Thessalonians 5:12-13: 12 We ask you, brothers, to respect those who labor among you and are over you in the Lord and admonish you, 13 and to esteem them very highly in love because of their work. Be at peace among yourselves.

Heb 13:7, 17; Remember your leaders, those who spoke to you the word of God. Consider the outcome of their way of life, and imitate their faith. And, 17 Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with groaning, for that would be of no advantage to you.

How do we respect these men? Giving them double honor; to those who: 3 job requirements – rule well and ‘labor in the word’ and ‘in teaching’ (preach and teach); This isn’t an exhaustive list by any stretch of the imagination. This really just seems to me to be the work seen in public – which fits our context. The Truth is, so much of what they do is really ‘alone’ stuff or ‘one on one’ stuff or even ‘small group’ stuff.

John Newton described ministry as ‘a sorrow full of joy’… That’s really accurate.

This is a beautiful description of the men in our church who have been laboring, toiling in the word and then preaching this Word. They work on a couple of texts and prepare that work to be presented to a group of their peers. Then, they have an opportunity to preach one of those texts to the congregation.

Some see these as two separate elder groups: Leaders and preachers/teachers. Note it says those who rule well, but ‘especially’ those who preach and teach. I don’t think ‘especially’ is focused on the teaching and preaching, but on those who κόπος (kopos)- labor; this is a demanding work; vs 18 is the proof text (rd); I like this; Paul uses two separate passages: Deuteronomy 25:4; The 2nd is a quote of Jesus; that’s pretty cool; Lk 10:7; Paul was very familiar with Luke; some scholars insist that Paul would have been familiar with Luke, since Luke may very well have been working on it while traveling with Paul;

app.: The point is this: respect, w/ double honor, your elders

t.s.: Respecting your elders…2nd,

  1. Protecting your Elders (19)

exp.: rd v 19; protect them from accusation: it is a very serious matter to bring a charge against your elders; Don’t allow it, except where the process of church discipline has properly taken place;

ill.: Consider this: because the elders are very public in their service, they open themselves up to harsh criticism. They’re easy targets. That criticism can be harsh, especially when those who pass judgment don’t have all of the information in front of them. We do so much harm when we ‘accuse’ our elders of negligence and self-motivation because we simply disagree with their leadership; oftentimes it is simply a matter of change that upsets an individual; Someone doesn’t like a decision, a plan, a program, a change in the current system or program;

app.: Respecting our elders is seen in the protection of our elders from false or inflammatory remarks about their leadership and the decisions they make.

t.s.: However, with that said, no elder is perfect; Sometimes an elder needs to be corrected;

ill.: Vibe magazine interviewed popular comedian and actor Chris Rock.

When asked, “Were you raised Christian?” Rock answered: “I wasn’t raised anything, to tell you the truth. My grandfather was a…preacher. He was the funniest guy. He used to curse a lot, run around, whatever. A bunch of deacons from his church got arrested for selling coke. Not selling it out of the church, but you know.”

When asked, “Do you ever regret that you don’t have a connection to a long tradition of belief?” Rock replied: “That I’m not Baptist or whatever? And I don’t have this thing to pass down? Not at all. ‘Cause I do have a long tradition of belief. My belief is in working hard and treating people well. All that other stuff is nonsense.”

app.: Ok, there is so much in those statements, but let me just say: Elders Cursing and ‘running around’. That needs to be confronted. Deacons selling cocaine? Elders like that need to be asked to step down. But there is a huge spectrum between an elder participating in illegal behavior and making mistakes. So, just being an elder doesn’t mean he won’t make mistakes. He will. And when he does, he needs to be corrected…

t.s: that is why Paul continues v 20;

Correcting your Elders (20-21)

exp.: when coupled with v 19, this lines up with church discipline as we’ve been taught by Jesus in Matthew 18; We often err, by not going to the member or the elder; and discussing this one-on-one; We hurt the body when we stand in the hallway and criticize our elders (or anyone for that matter); Should one of us have a problem, go and talk directly to him (that’s first); and if he won’t listen… then 2nd, take two or three witnesses and talk this over with him; if he still won’t listen; bring your two or three witnesses and rebuke him in the presence of the body; The process Jesus gives us is for protecting us on all sides:

  • It protects the person in sin, by allowing them the opportunity to repent without humiliation before the whole body.
  • It protects the person doing the confronting, by allowing them to be corrected if they’re wrong. Most problems like these can be cleared up with a little understanding.
  • It protects the body by strengthening these relationships and bringing healing to that one localized area.

Exp.: rd v 21; Paul reminds Timothy not to show partiality to the elders, don’t prejudge them.

t.s.: each one should be Respecting, Protecting, Correcting, and finally Paul reminds them to be careful in …

Selecting your Elders (22-25)

exp.: rd v 22; caution: don’t lay hands on to quickly; 1st, this is for Timothy, not the body; The senior elder has a tremendous responsibility in leading the flock; when he lays his hands on a man who is unqualified, he ‘shares’ in their sins, past and future; κοινωνέω (koinōneō); this is the vb form of Koinonia (n); that is why he says in v 22c; keep (a watchful eye); yourself pure;

ill.: IH Marshall: this can be used of sharing in gifts and experiences or in actions; it may also be used for giving a share in something to somebody. Here the thought is clearly that by showing some kind of positive attitude to a sinner one is approving of the person and thereby sharing in that person’s sins in the sense of sharing in the responsibility and hence the guilt for them.

It makes me think of Chris Rock’s Grandfather and his leaders selling cocaine. And then Paul adds this parenthetical statement: rd v 23; issues of purity and health; So Paul brings his thoughts to a summation in vs 24-25; rd v 24-5; Here is his point: you will recognize an elder before you select them; their good deeds will go before them;

Conclusion:

Church, you have a great responsibility in caring for yourself – and it begins in the Leadership you pick. I’m proud of the men you’ve selected. You’ve done a great job.

  • Jason Hall
  • Joshua Webb
  • Phil Baker
  • Lyle Skeels

 

Who is next or who are next? Will you commit this to prayer?

  1. Prayer for those who lead…
  2. Prayer for those whom God is bringing…
  3. The Elders will bring a recommendation, but the church has the final say. So pray…

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under 1 Timothy, Acts, Church History, Church Polity, Elders, Leadership, Scripture, Sermon, Sin

1 Timothy 5.1-16

Title: The Treatment of Members: Confronting & Caring

Text: 1 Timothy 5:1-16

CIT: Rules for members.

CIS: Rules for members.

Introduction:

Sometimes I think the whole Christian world is made up of just two groups: those who speak their faith and accomplish significant things for God, and those who criticize and malign the first group.

Don Basham, “On the Tip of My Tongue,”

Today I might sound critical of you… that isn’t my intention. I wish to be a part of the first group here – those who are a part of the solution…

You’ll note from the title of today’s message that the issue today is all about relationships. I have to say that I love it when the topic is relationships. I’ll reiterate what I’ve said so many times: nothing is more important in the church than relationships. If you want to know more, see me after the service. I’m serious…

Relationships are hard. Period. Some are harder than others, but it is what it is: hard! That is why they are so important. They’re important in evangelism, in discipleship, in worship, in prayer, in fellowship and the list goes on. Relationships permeate every aspect of the church. So, we need to get this right.

Think about our Purpose as a body: Imaging God. Our purpose isn’t to worship. Our purpose isn’t evangelism. Our purpose isn’t discipleship. Yes, we ‘do’ all of these. But, our purpose is to Glorify God. There is no commandment greater than Love the Lord your God with all of your heart, soul, mind, and strength. So, the question is, then, “what do we do when we haven’t been imaging God correctly?” We don’t like this part of relationships, but confronting members who are not imaging God correctly is our task.

But this is what I love about Paul’s letter. He’s saying to Timothy, Do the work of confronting, but do it in love! Let your first thought be love. Again, it comes back to relationships!

 

Opening Illustration: Joshua Harris

The Evangelical World has been rocked in the last few years with defectors from the faith. Most recently you’ve probably heard of Joshua Harris.

Ill.: Joshua Harris; I Kissed Dating Goodbye. 1997. Recently announced his divorce and renunciation of his faith. Before those two announcements, he made some statements in an interview where he simply said he was having trouble reconciling his theology with life.

I think that there’s a push by some people to say being sex-positive means — the kind of the historical sexual ethic related to sex outside of marriage, related to homosexuality, is basically laid aside, and embracing a healthy view of sex means just accepting all that as fine within the Christian tradition. … I do think though that, for me, in that change of interpretation of such a fundamental level when it comes to sexuality, it’s just hard for me to … In a way, it’s almost easier for me to contemplate throwing out all of Christianity than it is to keeping Christianity and adapting it in these different ways.

This is refreshing in the respect that he can’t reconcile what the world teaches and what the Bible teaches. The problem with liberal theology is that it can’t reconcile both either. Their stance is to just throw out those portions of Scripture. But, Harris doesn’t do that. He fully acknowledges that the Bible teaches something contrary to the world. There is more, and it comes out in an Instagram post or a tweet, I confuse the two. He stated that he isn’t a Christian. He said that based on his definition of what a Christian is, he isn’t. Others have encouraged him to move to a more liberal movement in observing the faith, but he has declared that he isn’t there yet.

Here’s the problem with a false gospel being preached from the pulpits – it creates a bunch of false followers who are in the game for all the wrong reasons. When God doesn’t do what the preachers have promised, then there is frustration and anger (and, I suppose, a step-by-step process of all the stages Kübler-Ross outlined) and eventually, a falling away.

To be honest, my heart hurts for these men and others like them who have left devastated followers in their wake. They preach a gospel of success and happiness that comes through legalism. They don’t call it that, but that is what they promise. Don’t date anymore. Instead, court and God will give you the blessings of a wonderful marriage.

Hear what I’m saying: court, date, get married through an arranged marriage. It doesn’t matter. In any of those cases, relationships are still hard! Do any of the following and your marriage might end. Do any of the following and your kids might still get sick – they might still die. Any message from a preacher who declares that if you’ll do this then God will do that – is a false doctrine.

And, this is precisely what Paul has been warning Timothy about in our letter: don’t let false teachers present a false gospel. The damage they bring is destructive. Look at 4.11-16 with me: 16 Keep a close watch on yourself and on the teaching. Persist in this, for by so doing you will save both yourself and your hearers.

Now, Paul outlined for Timothy to ‘Command and Teach’ these things: Personal godliness, Preaching the Word, Putting into Practice his giftedness, Diligence over his life and doctrine and dogged persistence in keeping a watchful eye over it all.

But how do you command and teach these things? When confronting members, it can be harsh. How do you confront an older man? How do you confront an older woman? Or, brothers and sisters your own age or younger? How do you talk to widows without seeming to be mean or hurtful?

It’s hard! Let’s look at what Paul says to Timothy in 5.1f; rd v 1;

So the first thing Paul mentions here is how to be direct with members.

I.     Confronting Members (1-2)

exp.: ἐπιπλήσσω (epiplēssō); epi – at or before; plēsō – to strike; to strike at; do not sharply rebuke; we use this kind of language when someone says something and we reply: Oh, that hurt! Or That’s hitting below the belt! This word appears nowhere else in the NT or LXX; ἀλλὰ; a marker of emphatic contrast; but, exhort or encourage; 4:13; There must be a way to confront without hurting. Sure, there is some discomfort, but you want to teach what is correct without hurting the person. That’s the goal here.

  • Confronting Older Men (v 1)

exp.: an older man; πρεσβύτερος (presbyteros); Elder; this is not the office, but referring to age; probably above 40; more like above 50; no doubt 60; ὡς; as or like, a father; your biological; Consider how you would talk to

  • Confronting Younger Men (v 1)

exp.: your peers; as brothers;

  • Confronting Older Women (v 2)

exp.: an older woman; same as above; ὡς; as or like, a father;

  • Confronting Younger Women (v 2)

exp.: as sisters, in all purity; probably just with this last phrase; a 2nd reminder of the moral responsibility as a man of God;

app.: The Context is that for a pastor, don’t lash out at people; There is an appropriate way to handle problems we have with members; Timothy isn’t to Lord it over them just because he’s the pastor. But, instead he is to confront these brothers and sisters in Christ with respect and dignity and honor (5th commandment);

I don’t think this is just for a young pastor. We can be this way with each other. We should be, right?

Paul turns his attention to another situation in Ephesus: Widows rd v 3;

II.    Caring for Widows (3-8)

exp.: I don’t know about you, but I’m like: Truly Widows? Isn’t the definition of a widow pretty clear?

  • Truly a Widow (really, indeed)

exp.: rd v 3; Lk 23:47 – this really was an innocent man; Lk 24:34 – The Lord is really risen; Jn 8:36 – If the Son sets you free indeed; Mark 11.32 – John was truly a prophet. What Paul is saying here is that there are women who have lost their husbands, but aren’t in the desperate need that other women who’ve lost their husbands are. I don’t think he’s being mean or harsh. Paul is trying to not overload the work of the church. Think about this for a moment: a woman in that culture didn’t work like men did. We do find women working and we find them in leadership, but for the overwhelming majority of the women, when they lost their husbands, they lost their livelihood. So Paul breaks down the need into categories. He identifies those who are truly needy and those without.

  • Types of Widows

          –  Widow w/ family (4)

exp.: rd v 4a; a widow who has family (children and grandchildren); them is a plural pronoun, which I believe points back to the children and grandchildren; ‘widow’ is singular here. Let the children and grandchildren care for her – and return to them the same care she gave them; Consider what she has done for them through the years. It’s time to reciprocate. How many diapers has she changed? Bottoms has she wiped and cleaned? How many meals has she cooked for them? How many times has she cared for them when they were sick? Cleaned up vomit? Spit up? Held them, cried for them, prayed over them? She didn’t do it thinking someday they’ll return the favor. She did it out of love. It’s time now for her children and grandchildren to show that same love to her; rd 4b; this is pleasing in the sight of God; godliness and obedience; it’s how you honor them.

          –  Widow w/ no family (5)

exp.: rd v 5a; a widow who is truly a widow has no family (μονόω), we get our word ‘mono’ for singular; monologue; monotonous; she’s alone.

  • Alone: has no concern except for the Lord; her family is the church and the church should care for her;
  • She is concerned for the affairs of God; So God’s family should take her in and care for her;

          –  Widow w/ finances (6)

exp.: rd v 6; a widow who is self-sufficient, wealthy, resources; lit.: living in luxury; contrast the widow whose concern is the church and the woman whose concern is her own selfishness; she may have no family, but she has her money and her things;

  • Teach these Warnings (7-8)

exp.: rd v 7, who is the ‘they’; v 8 (4, 16); The family; If she has relatives, they are responsible for her; if they don’t care for her, then that is a poor witness; they’ve done two things: denied the faith, worse than an unbeliever; opposite of v 4; ungodly; disobedient; no honor; isn’t better to be an unbeliever and be seen as an unbeliever, than to be a believer and bring harm to the body as a poor witness?

t.s.: Paul moves quickly to “the list”

III.  Criteria for Widowhood (9-16)

exp.: What is this List? Rd v 9-10; The List: There seems to have been an official place for older widows, they had certain requirements and if the church had been supported by these ladies, then, by all means, the church should care for them. Titus 2:3-5;

ill.: J. MacArthur: Their duties surely included helping with the baptism of women, visiting the sick, visiting prisoners, teaching and discipling younger women, helping younger women rear and nurture their children, and providing hospitality for visitors and strangers. They may have also assisted in placing orphans into proper Christian homes. That was a very important ministry in the Roman world, since orphaned or abandoned children wound up as slaves, and often as prostitutes or gladiators. With their own husbands gone and their children grown, those widows had the time to pursue such essential ministries.

That such a group of widows existed in the early church is known from extra-biblical sources. In the late first and early second centuries, Ignatius and Polycarp wrote of such an order. Tertullian, who lived in the latter part of the second and early part of the third centuries, also mentioned it. The third-century document known as the Didascalia and the fourth-century ‘Apostolic Constitutions’ also refer to an order of widows.

  1. Three Criteria to make the List (9-10)
    1. Age
    2. Marital Fidelity
    3. Service (good works)
      1. Brought up her children; this isn’t necessarily in the order of preference or prominence, but it definitely deserves some attention. Is there a greater task of importance than a mother to her children? Maybe to her husband, but that would be it.
      2. Hospitable
      3. Washed feet
      4. Cared for the afflicted (θλίβω (thlibō) under pressure to squeeze; it means to be between a rock and a hard place)
      5. Devoted herself to these ‘good works’
  2. Caution/Urge Younger Widows to marry (11-15)
    1. Downward spiral
    2. Better to Marry

exp.: evidently, some of the widows have fallen for this false teaching in the church, they’ve chased after the things of this world and are causing trouble in the church.

There is something really interesting here that takes place throughout this chapter:

  1. The order of people who care for widows: (16)
    1. Children and Grandchildren (v 4)
    2. Male Relatives (v 8)
    3. Female Relatives (v 16)

 

I don’t think this means that the church should ignore widows who have relatives who can care for them. But, it does help us in regard to identifying widows in need and our responsibility to care for them.

Conclusion:

So, what is Paul saying here:

  1. Anyone can be led astray: Old, young; male, female.

– Widows, in particular, were targeted with false teaching in Ephesus.

Ill.: Joanne Walker of Corvalis, Montana: Our wedding reception, in my parents’ home, ended late. Mom didn’t try to clean up until the next morning. To her dismay, there were cake crumbs everywhere! “How careless the guests were,” she thought to herself.

Until she went to the kitchen. There, still neatly stacked and clean, were the plates and forks–forgotten by my mother in the busyness of the preparations. In other words, with all of her work, she forgot to set out the very utensils needed to prevent such a mess. In her busyness, she forgot her business.

  1. Busyness vs. Business

It’s easy to forget in the busyness of the church what the true business is. Let’s not get so busy with things that we overlook a very important part of our church: Our widows – those women (and I might add men) who are truly widows indeed.

Difference between the Y and the I; Busyness leads to questions: Why are their crumbs all over the floor, Why were people so careless? Business, true business leads to the I…what can I do, How can I help?

You know, it’s pretty easy to be critical of how things are (the 2nd group I mentioned in the beginning), but let’s not just be busy for the sake of busyness; Ask yourself, in my relationship to all the members, Old men, Old women, Young Men, Young Women, Widows…what am I doing to help? Let’s work together to meet needs.

Someone should make a list of our widows and carefully outline them according to these guidelines from Paul. This falls under the care of the deacons, but I know that there are others interested in helping and the deacons could sure use the help. It really is embarrassing to think of some of the widows who’ve received no care.

Leave a comment

Filed under 1 Timothy, Leadership, Scripture, Sermon